Wednesday, July 28, 2010

more "america in color"

Assembling B-25 bombers at North American Aviation. Kansas City, Kansas, October 1942. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Alfred T. Palmer. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Children stage a patriotic demonstration. Southington, Connecticut, May 1942. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Fenno Jacobs. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Woman is working on a "Vengeance" dive bomber Tennessee, February 1943. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Alfred T. Palmer. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Women workers employed as wipers in the roundhouse having lunch in their rest room, Chicago and Northwest Railway Company. Clinton, Iowa, April 1943. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

A store with live fish for sale. Vicinity of Natchitoches, Louisiana, July 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Marion Post Wolcott. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

A crossroads store, bar, "juke joint," and gas station in the cotton plantation area. Melrose, Louisiana, June 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Marion Post Wolcott. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

america in color

Young African American boy. Cincinnati, Ohio, 1942 or 1943. Photo by John Vachon. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Boy building a model airplane as girl watches. Robstown, Texas, January 1942. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Arthur Rothstein. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

On the main street of Cascade. Cascade, Idaho, July 1941. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Distributing surplus commodities. St. Johns, Arizona, October 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

School children singing. Pie Town, New Mexico, October 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

The Faro Caudill family eating dinner in their dugout. Pie Town, New Mexico, October 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Jack Whinery, homesteader, and his family. Pie Town, New Mexico, October 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Children asleep on bed during square dance. McIntosh County, Oklahoma, 1939 or 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Orchestra at square dance. McIntosh County, Oklahoma, 1939 or 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Couples at square dance. McIntosh County, Oklahoma, 1939 or 1940, Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

At the Vermont state fair. Rutland, Vermont, September 1941. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Backstage at the "girlie" show at the state fair. Rutland, Vermont, September 1941. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Barker at the grounds at the state fair. Rutland, Vermont, September 1941. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Going to town on Saturday afternoon. Greene County, Georgia, May 1941. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Headlines posted in street-corner window of newspaper office (Brockton Enterprise). Brockton, Massachusetts, December 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Trucks outside of a starch factory. Caribou, Aroostook County, Maine, October 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Jack Delano. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Faro and Doris Caudill, homesteaders. Pie Town, New Mexico, October 1940. Reproduction from color slide. Photo by Russell Lee. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress


These photos from the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color photographs taken of the Depressions toll on America’s rural and tiny town populations. The photographs are owned by the Library of Congress and were featured in a 2006 exhibit Bound for Glory: America in Color.

Yes, I can't stop posting them. They just get better and better and better.

saul leiter - early color





My favorites...

shiri lee webb



Brendan posted this photo by Shiri Lee Webb (From her collection, Growing Pains) on his tumblr and I am obsessed. This is being added to my novel's visual underpinning cork board and has replaced my screensaver. So, Webb has managed to trump Eggleston in this instance.

Sunday, July 25, 2010

bought at the thrift store - williams, arizona






On the road trip to Los Angeles, we stopped in Williams, Texas by the Grand Canyon. Mark found this old cash drawer under a table. We love that it still has a spring and we plan on mounting the cover separately. We think the drawer will be perfect on our desk all filled up with sharpened pencils! I honestly have less than awesome associations with Dayton, Ohio but decided to not let that get me down as this was just too amazing to pass by.

I've been looking for a ship painting for some time and this was only fifteen bucks. I need to take a better shot of it but it's securely wrapped and will stay that way till it meets our new apartment.

Friday, July 2, 2010

the $200 debate



A scene from one of my favorite films, Paper Moon.

excerpts from "the picture press"







When Mark and I were in Mystic, Connecticut over Valentine's Day, you may recall we bought a truckload of books. Many of these were exhibition catalogues from the MoMA, most of which date to the sixties and seventies. The photos above refer to "The Picture Press." This show appeared in 1973 as a study of the advancement of photography in the world of journalism. So, there is a good deal of attention to development and printing techniques but also the eye of the journalist. The photographs take a turn over the years and become more openly comical or disturbing which is so interesting to follow in the catalogue. I spared you the more graphic shots be it a suicide pact, people running from a bomb, or a child petting his puppy after it was run over. I'm not kidding. If New Yorker's didn't walk into this exhibit and cry, I would be amazed.

I'm going to share more of these but here are some initial favorites I was able to scan today.

1. Flood - Photographer Unknown, Associated Press, January 27, 1969
"Flood waters cascade through door in Mandeville Canyon, near Los Angeles."
Scary, I know. This one got me thinking about the oil spill and all those nasty people who say New Orleans isn't worth the money and needs to be shut down. To that I say, California gets crazy weather from earthquakes, forest fires, and flooding to name a few. So it has Hollywood but New Orleans has jazz, the bayou, and voodoo. I'm just saying to the nasty people let's keep all of our states please!

2. This Is What Crazy Looks Like (my title) by Bill Quinn, New York Daily News, September 21, 1964
"Mrs. Nikki Shuttleworth holds Shawnee Trade Mark, adjudged best-in-show, and also holds blue ribbons won by her other entry, Shawnee White Wash, a long-haired Persian, who was runner-up at the annual International Cat Show in the Garden." One, where does this lady come up with these pet names? Two, why didn't White Wash get to be in the photo instead of those four ribbons? Lastly, this woman scares me.

3. Photographer Unknown, Photoworld, December 1948
This is the ultimate disturbing photo. Here's the caption: "Jack Riddle, 107, and his wife Josey, 86, were surprised just before Christmas by the Ku Klux Klan, complete with Klan Santa Claus, who presented them with a radio, for which the ex-slave had expressed a wish, saying he "wanted to hear the preachers." The Klan publicized the "good will" visit ten days after it occurred." Yeah, I don't think a radio is going to make him like or forgive you all that much.

4. Pint Sized Pin-Ups by Ed Clarity, New York Daily News, August 5, 1956
The caption is just the girls names and that they look "coy." I find this creepy.

5. Rupert (Rhino) by Chris Mills, Photoworld, date unknown
Accompanying news caption: "The days of "bliss" for Rhodesia's most famous orphan--Rupert the rhio--are gradually drawing to an end. The first experiment, to rear the six-week-old Kariba flood victim, began last May when Rupert's human foster parents took him into their home near Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia. Shortly the second big experiment in the life of this 400-lb. black rhino begins when he is returned to his wild life in the Matopos National Park, near Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia. Here, with the company of another Kariba survivor, the semi-grown female, Sal, it is hoped that Rupert will forget his days of domesticity. Only time will tell whether in fact he will forget the gallons of skimmed milk and bunches of bananas that quieted his hungry sequels or the sound of childish laughter when the fun-loving Rupert played with his foster brother and series." What devastating journalism. I like that this family treats him as one of their humans.